Biogeochemistry

, Volume 98, Issue 1, pp 101–113

Pelagic community respiration on the continental shelf off Georgia, USA

  • Li-Qing Jiang
  • Wei-Jun Cai
  • Yongchen Wang
  • Julia Diaz
  • Patricia L. Yager
  • Xinping Hu
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10533-009-9379-8

Cite this article as:
Jiang, LQ., Cai, WJ., Wang, Y. et al. Biogeochemistry (2010) 98: 101. doi:10.1007/s10533-009-9379-8

Abstract

The South Atlantic Bight (SAB) has been a focus for the study of continental shelf ecosystem respiration during the past two decades. However, two questions concerning respiration in this area have yet to be answered. First, why do previous estimates of respiration in the SAB exceed measured carbon fixation rates by almost an order of magnitude? Second, considering that bacteria are responsible for most of the pelagic community respiration in the SAB, why is respiration almost uniform from the coastline to the shelf break, while bacterial production estimates decrease offshore? This study addresses these critical questions by presenting new pelagic community respiration data that were collected across the entire width of the continental shelf off Georgia, USA from June 2003 to May 2006. The respiration was calculated as in vitro changes of dissolved oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations during deck incubations. The measured respiration rates ranged from 0.3(±0.1) to 21.2(±1.4) mmol m−3 day−1. They followed a clear seasonal pattern, being lowest over the entire shelf in winter and reaching maxima in summer. Summertime respiration rates were highest on the inner shelf and decreased with distance offshore. Consistent with this trend, bacterial abundance measurements taken during the sampling month of July 2005 followed a pattern of seaward decline. The SAB organic carbon fluxes calculated from the respiration data are close to the estimates for primary production, which resolves a long-standing mystery regarding perceived carbon imbalance in the SAB.

Keywords

Respiration Continental shelf Southeastern United States South Atlantic Bight Bacteria Organic carbon flux 

Abbreviations

BOD

Biochemical oxygen demand

CFZ

Coastal frontal zone

DIC

Dissolved inorganic carbon

DO

Dissolved oxygen

pCO2

Partial pressure of carbon dioxide

RQ

Respiratory quotient

SAB

South Atlantic Bight

SSS

Sea surface salinity

SST

Sea surface temperature

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li-Qing Jiang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wei-Jun Cai
    • 1
  • Yongchen Wang
    • 1
  • Julia Diaz
    • 1
    • 3
  • Patricia L. Yager
    • 1
  • Xinping Hu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Marine SciencesThe University of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Climate Program OfficeSilver SpringUSA
  3. 3.School of Earth and Atmospheric SciencesGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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