Biodiversity and Conservation

, Volume 23, Issue 12, pp 3005–3018

Recovery of the South Atlantic’s largest green turtle nesting population

  • Sam B. Weber
  • Nicola Weber
  • Jacqui Ellick
  • Andrew Avery
  • Robert Frauenstein
  • Brendan J. Godley
  • Jolene Sim
  • Natasha Williams
  • Annette C. Broderick
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10531-014-0759-6

Cite this article as:
Weber, S.B., Weber, N., Ellick, J. et al. Biodivers Conserv (2014) 23: 3005. doi:10.1007/s10531-014-0759-6

Abstract

Although many species of marine mega-vertebrates are threatened as a result of human activity, some populations are showing promising signs of recovery following decades of protection. In this study, we report on the status of the South Atlantic’s largest green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting aggregation at Ascension Island, 70 years after legal protection and the cessation of commercial turtle harvesting that decimated the population. Using a monitoring dataset spanning 36 years, we modelled long-term trends in nesting activity at both a rookery level and across individual nesting beaches and beach clusters. Since monitoring began in 1977, the average number of green turtle clutches deposited annually at Ascension Island has increased sixfold, from approximately 3,700 to 23,700; a trend that has been accompanied by a significant decrease in the average size of nesting females. Interestingly, however, rates of increase in nesting activity have varied dramatically among nesting beaches, ranging from 0.4 to 6 % growth per annum. More than 97 % of this variation could be explained by distance from the main human settlement of Georgetown—the historic centre of turtle harvesting—with beaches closer to Georgetown experiencing the most rapid growth. More rapid population growth close to human centres seems counterintuitive, but may reflect the more intensive depletion of these accessible, local stocks during the harvesting era. Overall, the Ascension Island green turtle population appears to be recovering strongly, mirroring positive trends for this species across many parts of its geographic range. While not a cause for complacency, these trends are encouraging and demonstrate the capacity of marine megafauna to rebound when anthropogenic pressures are alleviated through conservation action.

Keywords

Marine turtlePopulation trendPopulation sizeDemographic unitConservation statusFemale size

Supplementary material

10531_2014_759_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (72 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 71 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sam B. Weber
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nicola Weber
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jacqui Ellick
    • 3
  • Andrew Avery
    • 3
  • Robert Frauenstein
    • 3
  • Brendan J. Godley
    • 2
  • Jolene Sim
    • 1
  • Natasha Williams
    • 1
  • Annette C. Broderick
    • 2
  1. 1.Conservation DepartmentAscension Island GovernmentGeorgetownAscension Island, South Atlantic Ocean
  2. 2.Centre for Ecology and Conservation, College of Life & Environmental SciencesUniversity of ExeterPenrynUK
  3. 3.Ascension Island Turtle GroupGeorgetownAscension Island, South Atlantic Ocean