, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 1179-1191

Influence of Forest Types and Effects of Forestry Activities on Species Richness and Composition of Chrysomelidae in the Central Mountainous Region of Japan

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Abstract

Species richness and composition of the Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera) were studied in larch (Larix kaempheri [Lamb.] Carrière) plantations, secondary forests, and primary forests. In addition, the effects of forest management practices, such as thinning and long rotation, were examined in the larch plantation. The species richness of Chrysomelidae was higher in the larch plantation than in the secondary forest or in the primary forest. Among the larch plantations, the species richness in old-aged plantations was higher than that in middle-aged plantations. The composition of the beetle assemblages in the larch plantation differed from that in the secondary forest or in the primary forest. Exosoma akkoae (Chujo), Batophila acutangula Heikertinger, and Calomicrus nobyi Chujo were caught with a bias toward the larch plantation. Longitarsus succineus (Foudras) and Sphaeroderma tarsatum Baly were caught more in the secondary forest and the primary forest, respectively. More B. acutangula and S. tarsatum were caught in stands where their host plants occurred at higher rates. Species richness of understory plants was an important factor for chrysomlid species richness, and frequency of host occurrence affected the number of individuals of leaf beetles examined. It seems that forest types and forest management practices affect host plants as well as Chrysomelidae, and that these effects on the host plants also influence chrysomelid assemblages.