Biodiversity & Conservation

, Volume 14, Issue 13, pp 3265–3288

Presence and Abundance of Birds in an Atlantic Forest Reserve and Adjacent Plantation of Shade-Grown Yerba Mate, in Paraguay

  • Kristina L. Cockle
  • Marty L. Leonard
  • A. Alejandro Bodrati
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10531-004-0446-0

Cite this article as:
Cockle, K., Leonard, M. & Bodrati, A. Biodivers Conserv (2005) 14: 3265. doi:10.1007/s10531-004-0446-0

Abstract.

In the Atlantic forest region, there is a need to develop economic activities that can be carried out in buffer zones around parks, with minimal impact on forest bird species. One such possibility is the farming of yerba mate, Ilex paraguariensis, under native trees. We compared bird speciesȁ9 presence and abundance between a forest reserve and an adjacent plantation of shade-grown yerba mate, to determine which species might use such plantations. Of the 145 species that were regularly recorded in the forest, 66%, including five globally threatened species, were also regularly recorded in the plantation. Most canopy species and tree trunk insectivores showed similar abundance in both habitats, but forest floor and understory species were absent from the plantation. Within the plantation, higher tree density did not lead to a greater abundance of forest birds. Yerba mate grown under native trees could be used to rehabilitate cleared land and allow recolonization by some Atlantic forest bird species.

Keywords

AgricultureAgroecosystemAtlantic forestBirdsIlex paraguariensisShade-grownYerba mate

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kristina L. Cockle
    • 1
    • 3
  • Marty L. Leonard
    • 1
  • A. Alejandro Bodrati
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of BiologyDalhousie UniversityNova ScotiaCanada
  2. 2.Guyra ParaguayAsunciónParaguay
  3. 3.Fundación de Historia Natural Félix de AzaraBuenos AiresArgentina