Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 34, Issue 5, pp 965–972

RNAi-directed down-regulation of RSV results in increased resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

Authors

  • Yong Zhou
    • Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Key Laboratory of Plant Functional Genomics of Ministry of EducationYangzhou University
  • Yuan Yuan
    • Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Key Laboratory of Plant Functional Genomics of Ministry of EducationYangzhou University
  • Fuhai Yuan
    • Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Key Laboratory of Plant Functional Genomics of Ministry of EducationYangzhou University
  • Man Wang
    • Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Key Laboratory of Plant Functional Genomics of Ministry of EducationYangzhou University
  • Huan Zhong
    • Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Key Laboratory of Plant Functional Genomics of Ministry of EducationYangzhou University
  • Minghong Gu
    • Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Key Laboratory of Plant Functional Genomics of Ministry of EducationYangzhou University
    • Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Key Laboratory of Plant Functional Genomics of Ministry of EducationYangzhou University
Original Research Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10529-012-0848-0

Cite this article as:
Zhou, Y., Yuan, Y., Yuan, F. et al. Biotechnol Lett (2012) 34: 965. doi:10.1007/s10529-012-0848-0

Abstract

Rice stripe disease (RSD), caused by rice stripe virus (RSV), is a serious disease in temperate rice-growing areas. We have created an RNAi construct containing coat protein gene (CP) and disease specific protein gene (SP) sequences from RSV. The RNAi construct was transformed into two susceptible japonica varieties, Suyunuo and Guanglingxiangjing, to develop resistance against RSD. The homozygous progeny of rice plants in the T5 and T7 generations containing RNAi constructs, after self-fertilization were strongly resistant to viral infection. RT-PCR indicated that viral replication of SP and CP in the transgenic plants was significantly inhibited. There were no obvious morphological or developmental differences between the transgenic and wild-type plants from seedling stage to maturity. The excellent agronomic traits of these two varieties, such as high yield and good quality were maintained. Suppression of virus genes using RNAi is therefore a practical and effective strategy for controlling viral infection in crops.

Keywords

Coat protein geneDisease specific protein geneHomozygous transgenic plantsRice stripe virusRNAiVirus resistance

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012