Biogerontology

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 173–177

Caloric restriction and human longevity: what can we learn from the Okinawans?

Authors

    • College of NursingOkinawa Prefectural University
    • Pacific Health Research Institute
  • Bradley J. Willcox
    • Pacific Health Research Institute
    • Departments of Geriatric Medicine and MedicineJohn A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii
  • Hidemi Todoriki
    • Faculty of MedicineUniversity of the Ryukyus, Department of Environmental and Prevantive Medicine
  • J. David Curb
    • Pacific Health Research Institute
    • Departments of Geriatric Medicine and MedicineJohn A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii
  • Makoto Suzuki
    • Faculty of Human WelfareOkinawa International University,
OPINION

DOI: 10.1007/s10522-006-9008-z

Cite this article as:
Willcox, D.C., Willcox, B.J., Todoriki, H. et al. Biogerontology (2006) 7: 173. doi:10.1007/s10522-006-9008-z

Abstract

Caloric (or dietary) restriction (CR) extends lifespan and lowers risk for age associated diseases in a phylogenetically diverse group of species. Whether prolonged CR increases average or maximum lifespan or promotes a more youthful physiology in humans at advanced ages is not yet known. However, available epidemiological evidence indicates that CR may already have contributed to an extension of average and maximum life span in one human population and appears to have lowered risk for age associated chronic diseases in other human populations. We review the human studies in the context of a special human population, older Okinawans, who appear to have undergone a mild form of prolonged CR for about half their adult lives.

Keywords

Caloric restriction Okinawa Maximum life span Healthy aging Diet Longevity

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006