Behavior Genetics

, Volume 39, Issue 4, pp 359–370

A Twin Study of the Genetics of High Cognitive Ability Selected from 11,000 Twin Pairs in Six Studies from Four Countries

  • Claire M. A. Haworth
  • Margaret J. Wright
  • Nicolas W. Martin
  • Nicholas G. Martin
  • Dorret I. Boomsma
  • Meike Bartels
  • Danielle Posthuma
  • Oliver S. P. Davis
  • Angela M. Brant
  • Robin P. Corley
  • John K. Hewitt
  • William G. Iacono
  • Matthew McGue
  • Lee A. Thompson
  • Sara A. Hart
  • Stephen A. Petrill
  • David Lubinski
  • Robert Plomin
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s10519-009-9262-3

Cite this article as:
Haworth, C.M.A., Wright, M.J., Martin, N.W. et al. Behav Genet (2009) 39: 359. doi:10.1007/s10519-009-9262-3

Abstract

Although much genetic research has addressed normal variation in intelligence, little is known about the etiology of high cognitive abilities. Using data from 11,000 twin pairs (age range = 6–71 years) from the genetics of high cognitive abilities consortium, we investigated the genetic and environmental etiologies of high general cognitive ability (g). Age-appropriate psychometric cognitive tests were administered to the twins and used to create g scores standardized within each study. Liability-threshold model fitting was used to estimate genetic and environmental parameters for the top 15% of the distribution of g. Genetic influence for high g was substantial (0.50, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.41–0.60). Shared environmental influences were moderate (0.28, 0.19–0.37). We conclude that genetic variation contributes substantially to high g in Australia, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Keywords

GeneticsHigh cognitive abilityTwinsIntelligenceTalent

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claire M. A. Haworth
    • 1
  • Margaret J. Wright
    • 2
  • Nicolas W. Martin
    • 2
  • Nicholas G. Martin
    • 2
  • Dorret I. Boomsma
    • 3
  • Meike Bartels
    • 3
  • Danielle Posthuma
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Oliver S. P. Davis
    • 1
  • Angela M. Brant
    • 6
  • Robin P. Corley
    • 6
  • John K. Hewitt
    • 6
  • William G. Iacono
    • 7
  • Matthew McGue
    • 7
  • Lee A. Thompson
    • 8
  • Sara A. Hart
    • 9
  • Stephen A. Petrill
    • 9
  • David Lubinski
    • 10
  • Robert Plomin
    • 1
  1. 1.Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Queensland Institute of Medical ResearchBrisbaneAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Biological Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and EducationVU UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Section Medical GenomicsVU Medical CentreAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Section Functional Genomics, Faculty Earth and Life ScienceVU UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  6. 6.Institute for Behavioral GeneticsUniversity of Colorado at BoulderBoulderUSA
  7. 7.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  8. 8.Department of PsychologyCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  9. 9.Human Development and Family ScienceOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  10. 10.Department of Psychology and Human DevelopmentVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA