Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, 147:462

Gender Effects on Association of Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphism with Symptoms of Central Fatigue

Authors

    • Biological FacultyM. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University
  • J. V. Schegolkova
    • Biological FacultyM. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University
  • M. A. Kulikova
    • Biological FacultyM. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University
  • M. A. Timofeeva
    • Biological FacultyM. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University
  • V. A. Shlepcova
    • Biological FacultyM. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University
  • O. V. Sysoeva
    • Russian National Institute of Physical Education and Sport
  • A. G. Tonevitsky
    • Russian National Institute of Physical Education and Sport
Experimental Genetics

DOI: 10.1007/s10517-009-0559-2

Cite this article as:
Maluchenko, N.V., Schegolkova, J.V., Kulikova, M.A. et al. Bull Exp Biol Med (2009) 147: 462. doi:10.1007/s10517-009-0559-2

In order to test the “serotonin” hypothesis of the genesis of central fatigue, we studied association between genotype and fatigue (3-hour mental workload consisting of information processing and logical task solution) using analysis of variance for different indices (well-being, activity, mood, mental fatigue index). It was concluded that young men with serotonin deficit (LL genotype) and girls with serotonin excess (S genotype) were less tolerant to long-lasting mental workload. Thus, we confirmed that the degree of central fatigue depends on the function of the serotonin system and revealed gender differences in adaptive capacities of carriers of different variants of serotonin transporter.

Key Words

polymorphismserotonin transportercentral fatiguegender differences

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2009