Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 267–276

A Cross-Cultural Investigation of the Role of Foot Size in Physical Attractiveness

Authors

    • Department of AnthropologyUniversity of California
    • Department of AnthropologyUniversity of California, Los Angeles
  • Daniel Nettle
    • Division of Psychology, Brain and BehaviourUniversity of Newcastle
  • Yalda Afshar
    • Independent scholar
  • Isadora de Andrade Pinheiro
    • Department of SociologyUniversidade Federal da Bahia
  • Alexander Bolyanatz
    • Core ProgramBenedictine University
  • Monique Borgerhoff Mulder
    • Department of AnthropologyUniversity of California
  • Mark Cravalho
    • Department of SociologyUniversidade Federal da Bahia
  • Tiara Delgado
    • Independent documentary filmmaker
  • Bozena Gruzd
    • Independent scholar
  • Melissa Oliveira Correia
    • Department of SociologyUniversidade Federal da Bahia
  • Daria Khaltourina
    • School of History, Political Science and LawRussian State University for the Humanities
  • Andrey Korotayev
    • School of History, Political Science and LawRussian State University for the Humanities
  • Jocelyn Marrow
    • Committee on Human DevelopmentUniversity of Chicago
  • Lucineide Santiago de Souza
    • Department of SociologyUniversidade Federal da Bahia
  • Asta Zbarauskaite
    • Independent scholar
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10508-005-3115-9

Cite this article as:
Fessler, D.M.T., Nettle, D., Afshar, Y. et al. Arch Sex Behav (2005) 34: 267. doi:10.1007/s10508-005-3115-9

Abstract

Disparate cultural practices suggest that small foot size may contribute to female attractiveness. Two hypotheses potentially explain such a pattern. Sexual dimorphism in foot size may lead observers to view small feet as feminine and large feet as masculine. Alternately, because small female feet index both youth and nulliparity, evolution may have favored a male preference for this attribute in order to maximize returns on male reproductive investment. Whereas the observational hypothesis predicts symmetrical polarizing preferences, with small feet being preferred in women and large feet being preferred in men, the evolutionary hypothesis predicts asymmetrical preferences, with the average phenotype being preferred in men. Using line drawings that varied only in regard to relative foot size, we examined judgments of attractiveness in nine cultures. Small foot size was generally preferred for females, while average foot size was preferred for males. These results provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that humans possess an evolved preference for small feet in females.

Key Words

foot sizephysical attractivenesssexual selectionsexual dimorphism
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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005