Experimental and Applied Acarology

, Volume 50, Issue 4, pp 361–374

Molecular dissimilarities of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Brazil and its relation with samples throughout the world: is there a geographical pattern?

  • Leonardo Burlini
  • Kátia R. S. Teixeira
  • Matias P. J. Szabó
  • Kátia M. Famadas
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10493-009-9321-8

Cite this article as:
Burlini, L., Teixeira, K.R.S., Szabó, M.P.J. et al. Exp Appl Acarol (2010) 50: 361. doi:10.1007/s10493-009-9321-8

Abstract

In this study the genetic variability of Rhipicephalus sanguineus within Brazil and its relation with ticks of the same group from different continents was evaluated. Mitochondrial 12S and 16S rDNA fragments of R. sanguineus from seven Brazilian States were sequenced and compared to GenBank sequences of R. sanguineus and R. turanicus ticks from Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and USA. Results indicate a relatively high intra-specific variability between Brazilian samples but also a global latitude linked distribution pattern of at least two major R. sanguineus groups; one group distributed from latitude 25°N to 22°S including R. sanguineus from Brazil, Taiwan and Thailand and R. turanicus from Zambia and Zimbabwe, and the other group found closer to the poles, roughly above 29°N and below 30°S with ticks from Argentina, Uruguay, France, Oklahoma (USA), Israel and Egypt.

Keywords

Genotypic variabilityRhipicephalus sanguineusBrazil12S mt-rDNA16S mt-rDNALatitude

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonardo Burlini
    • 1
  • Kátia R. S. Teixeira
    • 2
  • Matias P. J. Szabó
    • 3
  • Kátia M. Famadas
    • 4
  1. 1.Curso de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinárias, DPA/IV/UFRRJ, CAPES ScholarshipSeropédicaBrazil
  2. 2.Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Agrobiologia (EMBRAPA—Agrobiologia)Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa AgropecuáriaSeropédicaBrazil
  3. 3.Universidade Federal de UberlândiaUberlândiaBrazil
  4. 4.Departamento de Parasitologia AnimalIV/UFRRJSeropédicaBrazil