Experimental & Applied Acarology

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 83–100

Ticks (Ixodidae) on humans in South America

  • A. A. Guglielmone
  • L. Beati
  • D. M. Barros-Battesti
  • M. B. Labruna
  • S. Nava
  • J. M. Venzal
  • A. J. Mangold
  • M. P. J. Szabó
  • J. R. Martins
  • D. González-Acuña
  • A. Estrada-Peña
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10493-006-9027-0

Cite this article as:
Guglielmone, A.A., Beati, L., Barros-Battesti, D.M. et al. Exp Appl Acarol (2006) 40: 83. doi:10.1007/s10493-006-9027-0
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Abstract

Twenty eight species of Ixodidae have been found on man in South America (21 Amblyomma, 1 Boophilus, 2 Dermacentor, 2 Haemaphysalis, 1 Ixodes and 1 Rhipicephalus species). Most of them are rarely found on man. However, three species frequently parasitize humans in restricted areas of Argentina (A. neumanni reported from 46 localities), Uruguay (A. triste from 21 sites) and Argentina–Brazil (A. parvum from 27 localities). The most widespread ticks are A. cajennense (134 localities in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Suriname and Venezuela), A. ovale (37 localities in Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Suriname and Venezuela) and A. oblongoguttatum (28 sites in Brazil, Colombia, French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname and Venezuela). Amblyomma aureolatum (18 localities in Argentina, Brazil, French Guiana and Paraguay), A. cajennense, and A. triste are vectors of rickettsioses to man in South America. A better understanding of the respective roles of these and other tick species in transmitting pathogens to humans will require further local investigations. Amblyomma ticks should be the main subjects of these studies followed by species of Boophilus, Dermacentor, Haemaphysalis and Rhipicephalus species. In contrast with North America, Europe and Asia, ticks of the genus Ixodes do not appear to be major players in transmitting diseases to human. Indeed, there is only one record of an Ixodes collected while feeding on man for all South America.

Keywords

Ticks Ixodidae Humans South America 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. A. Guglielmone
    • 1
  • L. Beati
    • 2
  • D. M. Barros-Battesti
    • 3
  • M. B. Labruna
    • 4
  • S. Nava
    • 1
  • J. M. Venzal
    • 5
  • A. J. Mangold
    • 1
  • M. P. J. Szabó
    • 6
  • J. R. Martins
    • 7
  • D. González-Acuña
    • 8
  • A. Estrada-Peña
    • 9
  1. 1.Instituto Nacional de Tecnología AgropecuariaEstación Experimental Agropecuaria RafaelaRafaelaArgentina
  2. 2.United States National Tick Collection, Institute of Arthropodology and Parasitology and Department of BiologyGeorgia Southern UniversityStatesboroUSA
  3. 3.Instituto Butantan, Laboratório de ParasitologiaSão PauloBrazil
  4. 4.Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e ZootecniaUniversidade de São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  5. 5.Departamento de Parasitología VeterinariaFacultad de VeterinariaMontevideoUruguay
  6. 6.Faculdade de Medicina VeterináriaUniversidade Federal de UberlandiaUberlandiaBrazil
  7. 7.Fundação Estadual de Pesquisa AgropecuáriaInstituto de Pesquisas Veterinárias Desiderio FinamorEldorado do SulBrazil
  8. 8.Facultad de Medicina VeterinariaUniversidad de ConcepciónChillánChile
  9. 9.Facultad de VeterinariaUnidad de ParasitologíaZaragozaSpain

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