Original Paper

Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research

, Volume 38, Issue 5, pp 368-383

A Comprehensive Model for Mental Health Tobacco Recovery in New Jersey

  • Jill M. WilliamsAffiliated withDivision of Addiction Psychiatry, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolUMDNJ-School of Public Health Email author 
  • , Mia Hanos ZimmermannAffiliated withDivision of Addiction Psychiatry, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
  • , Marc L. SteinbergAffiliated withDivision of Addiction Psychiatry, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolUMDNJ-School of Public Health
  • , Kunal K. GandhiAffiliated withDivision of Addiction Psychiatry, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolUMDNJ-School of Public Health
  • , Cris DelnevoAffiliated withUMDNJ-School of Public Health
  • , Michael B. SteinbergAffiliated withUMDNJ-School of Public HealthUMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
  • , Jonathan FouldsAffiliated withPennsylvania State University College of Medicine

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Abstract

Despite the high prevalence of tobacco use, disproportionate tobacco consumption, and excess morbidity and mortality, smokers with mental illness have reduced access to tobacco dependence treatment across the health care spectrum. We have developed a comprehensive model for Mental Health Tobacco Recovery in New Jersey (MHTR-NJ) that has the overarching goal of improving tobacco cessation for smokers with serious mental illness. Important steps involve engaging patients, professionals and the community to increase understanding that addressing tobacco use is important. In addition to increasing demand for tobacco treatment services, we must educate mental health professionals in evidence-based treatments so that patients can seek help in their usual behavioral health care setting. Peer services that offer hope and support to smokers are essential. Each of the policy or cessation initiatives described address the two core goals of this model: to increase demand for tobacco cessation services for mentally ill smokers and to help more smokers with mental illness to quit. Each has been pilot tested for feasibility and/or effectiveness and revised with feedback from stakeholders. In this way this implementation model has brought together academics, clinicians, administrators and mental health consumers to develop tobacco programming and policy that has been tested in a real world environment and serves as a model for other states.

Keywords

Tobacco Mental health Recovery