Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research

, Volume 35, Issue 4, pp 283–294

When Programs Benefit Some People More than Others: Tests of Differential Service Effectiveness

  • Cathaleene Macias
  • Danson R. Jones
  • William A. Hargreaves
  • Qi Wang
  • Charles F. Rodican
  • Paul J. Barreira
  • Paul B. Gold
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10488-008-0174-y

Cite this article as:
Macias, C., Jones, D.R., Hargreaves, W.A. et al. Adm Policy Ment Health (2008) 35: 283. doi:10.1007/s10488-008-0174-y

Abstract

Practitioners need to know for whom evidence-based services are most or least effective, but few services research studies provide this information. Using data from a randomized controlled comparison of supported employment findings for two multi-service psychiatric rehabilitation programs, we illustrate and compare procedures for measuring program-by-client characteristic interactions depicting differential program effectiveness, and then illustrate how a significant program-by-client interaction can explain overall program differences in service effectiveness. Interaction analyses based on cluster analysis-identified sample subgroups appear to provide statistically powerful and meaningful hypothesis tests that can aid in the interpretation of main effect findings and help to refine program theory.

Keywords

Treatment moderationCo-occurring disordersSubgroup analysesSupported employment

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cathaleene Macias
    • 1
  • Danson R. Jones
    • 1
  • William A. Hargreaves
    • 2
  • Qi Wang
    • 1
  • Charles F. Rodican
    • 1
  • Paul J. Barreira
    • 3
  • Paul B. Gold
    • 4
  1. 1.McLean HospitalBelmontUSA
  2. 2.University of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  4. 4.Medical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA