Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research

, Volume 34, Issue 6, pp 519–529

Race and Ethnicity Differences in Reporting of Depressive Symptoms

  • Janice C. Probst
  • Sarah B. Laditka
  • Charity G. Moore
  • Nusrat Harun
  • M. Paige Powell
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10488-007-0136-9

Cite this article as:
Probst, J.C., Laditka, S.B., Moore, C.G. et al. Adm Policy Ment Health (2007) 34: 519. doi:10.1007/s10488-007-0136-9

Abstract

Our study explored race and ethnicity differences in reporting of symptoms to physicians and other practitioners among respondents to the 1999 National Health Interview Survey who screened positive for depression. Respondents were asked if they had told a doctor or another practitioner (nurse, social worker, psychologist, clergy, other) about their problems. Whites and Hispanics were significantly more likely to communicate with a physician or other practitioner than were African Americans, even with personal characteristics held constant. Practitioners should actively elicit descriptions of feelings and mood, especially with African Americans, and be prepared to treat or refer patients appropriately.

Keywords

DepressionCommunicationDisparitiesAfrican Americans

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janice C. Probst
    • 1
  • Sarah B. Laditka
    • 1
  • Charity G. Moore
    • 2
  • Nusrat Harun
    • 3
  • M. Paige Powell
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Health Services Policy and Management, Arnold School of Public HealthUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Research on Health Care Data CenterUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsArnold School of Public HealthColumbiaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Health Services AdministrationUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA