Original Paper

American Journal of Community Psychology

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 51-59

Keeping the Spirit of Community Partnerships Alive in the Scale Up of HIV/AIDS Prevention: Critical Reflections on the Roll Out of DEBI (Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions)

  • Shari L. DworkinAffiliated withHIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia UniversityDepartment of Psychiatry, Columbia University Email author 
  • , Rogério M. PintoAffiliated withColumbia University School of Social Work
  • , Joyce HunterAffiliated withHIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia UniversityDepartment of Psychiatry, Columbia University
  • , Bruce RapkinAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • , Robert H. RemienAffiliated withHIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia UniversityDepartment of Psychiatry, Columbia University

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

DEBI, or the Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions is the largest centralized effort to diffuse evidence-based prevention science to fight HIV/AIDS in the United States. DEBI seeks to ensure that the most effective science-based prevention interventions are widely implemented across the country in community-based organizations. Thus, this is a particularly timely juncture in which to critically reflect on the extent to which known principles of community collaboration have guided key processes associated with the DEBI rollout. We review the available evidence on how the dissemination of packaged interventions is necessary but not sufficient for ensuring the success of technology transfer. We consider additional principles that are vital for successful technology transfer, which were not central considerations in the rollout of the DEBI initiative. These issues are: (1) community perceptions of a top-down mode of dissemination; (2) the extent to which local innovations are being embraced, bolstered, or eliminated; and (3) contextual and methodological considerations that shape community preparedness. Consideration of these additional factors is necessary in order to effectively document, manage, and advance the science of dissemination and technology transfer in centralized prevention efforts within and outside of HIV/AIDS.

Keywords

Community partnerships HIV/AIDS prevention interventions Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) Technology transfer Power relations