AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 17, Issue 6, pp 2022–2030

Rapid HIV Testing for Individuals on Probation/Parole: Outcomes of an Intervention Trial

  • Michael S. Gordon
  • Timothy W. Kinlock
  • Michelle McKenzie
  • Monique E. Wilson
  • Josiah D. Rich
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-013-0456-6

Cite this article as:
Gordon, M.S., Kinlock, T.W., McKenzie, M. et al. AIDS Behav (2013) 17: 2022. doi:10.1007/s10461-013-0456-6

Abstract

Many probationers and parolees do not receive HIV testing despite being at increased risk for obtaining and transmitting HIV. A two-group randomized controlled trial was conducted between April, 2011 and May, 2012 at probation/parole offices in Baltimore, Maryland and Providence/Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Male and female probationers/parolees were interviewed (n = 1,263) and then offered HIV testing based on random assignment to one of two conditions: (1) On-site rapid HIV testing conducted at the probation/parole office; or (2) Referral for rapid HIV testing off site at a community HIV testing clinic. Outcomes were: (1) undergoing HIV testing; and (2) receipt of HIV testing results. Participants were significantly more likely to be tested on-site at a probation/parole office versus off-site at a HIV testing clinic (p < 0.001). There was no difference between the two groups in terms of receiving HIV testing results. Findings indicate that probationers/parolees are willing to be tested on-site and, independent of testing location, are equally willing to receive their results. Implications for expanding rapid HIV testing to more criminal justice related locations and populations are discussed.

Keywords

Rapid testingProbationParoleHIVHIV risk behaviors

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael S. Gordon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Timothy W. Kinlock
    • 1
    • 3
  • Michelle McKenzie
    • 4
  • Monique E. Wilson
    • 1
  • Josiah D. Rich
    • 4
  1. 1.Friends Research Institute, Inc.BaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Criminal JusticeStevenson UniversityStevensonUSA
  3. 3.College of Public Affairs, School of Criminal JusticeUniversity of BaltimoreBaltimoreUSA
  4. 4.Brown University Medical School, The Miriam Hospital, The Center for Prisoner Health and Human RightsProvidenceUSA