AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 17, Supplement 2, pp 128–136

Linkage to HIV Care for Jail Detainees: Findings From Detention to the First 30 Days After Release

  • Cristina A. Booker
  • Christopher T. Flygare
  • Liza Solomon
  • Sarah W. Ball
  • Meredith R. Pustell
  • Lauri B. Bazerman
  • Dominique Simon-Levine
  • Paul A. Teixeira
  • Jacqueline Cruzado-Quinones
  • Ryan N. Kling
  • Paula M. Frew
  • Anne C. Spaulding
  • The EnhanceLink Study Group
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-012-0354-3

Cite this article as:
Booker, C.A., Flygare, C.T., Solomon, L. et al. AIDS Behav (2013) 17: 128. doi:10.1007/s10461-012-0354-3

Abstract

Of people living with HIV in the US, ~16 % or over 150,000 individuals passed through a correctional facility in 2006. Given the enormous impact of HIV within incarcerated populations, facilitating continuity of care from jails to the community is particularly important in reducing morbidity and mortality for releasees. Grantees participating in the Enhancing Linkages to HIV Primary Care in Jail Settings Initiative developed models for identifying HIV-positive detainees during incarceration and linking them to care following release. In this sample of 1,021 HIV-infected releasees, 79 % received clinical services and 74 % received additional community services within 30 days post-release. Our analysis found several significant factors associated with linkage including: receipt of HIV or medication education in jail, having a completed discharge plan at release, staff awareness of clients’ release date, and stable housing on the 30th day post-release. In addition, a subset of participants who had both jail and community viral load assessments showed a statistically significant increase in suppressed viral load. EnhanceLink data suggest that jails may be effective settings to engage individuals in care.

Keywords

JailHIVServicesLinkage

Supplementary material

10461_2012_354_MOESM1_ESM.docx (152 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 152 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cristina A. Booker
    • 1
  • Christopher T. Flygare
    • 1
  • Liza Solomon
    • 1
  • Sarah W. Ball
    • 1
  • Meredith R. Pustell
    • 1
  • Lauri B. Bazerman
    • 2
  • Dominique Simon-Levine
    • 3
  • Paul A. Teixeira
    • 4
  • Jacqueline Cruzado-Quinones
    • 4
  • Ryan N. Kling
    • 1
  • Paula M. Frew
    • 5
    • 6
  • Anne C. Spaulding
    • 5
    • 7
  • The EnhanceLink Study Group
  1. 1.Abt Associates Inc.CambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Division of Infectious DiseasesThe Miriam HospitalProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.Allies in RecoveryNorthamptonUSA
  4. 4.New York City Department of Health and Mental HygieneNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of MedicineSchool of Medicine, Emory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  6. 6.Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health EducationRollins School of Public Health, Emory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  7. 7.Department of EpidemiologyRollins School of Public Health, Emory UniversityAtlantaUSA