AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 168–173

Substance Use Predictors of Poor Medication Adherence: The Role of Substance Use Coping Among HIV-Infected Patients in Opioid Dependence Treatment

  • Adam Gonzalez
  • Matthew J. Mimiaga
  • Jared Israel
  • C. Andres Bedoya
  • Steven A. Safren
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-012-0319-6

Cite this article as:
Gonzalez, A., Mimiaga, M.J., Israel, J. et al. AIDS Behav (2013) 17: 168. doi:10.1007/s10461-012-0319-6

Abstract

Many HIV-infected injection drug users (IDUs) continue to use illicit substances despite being in substance use treatment. Substance use is associated with non-adherence to HIV medications; however underlying mechanisms regarding this relation are understudied. The current investigation examined the role of substance use coping in terms of the relation between substance use and HIV medication adherence. Participants were 121 HIV-infected IDUs (41 % female, M age = 47, SD = 7.1) in opioid dependence treatment. Participants completed self-report questionnaires, were administered clinical interviews and oral toxicology screens, and used a medication-event-monitoring-system cap to assess 2 week HIV medication adherence. The use of cocaine and multiple substances were significantly related to decreased medication adherence. Substance use coping mediated these associations. Findings highlight the importance of assessing, monitoring, and targeting ongoing substance use, and ways to increase positive coping for HIV-infected IDUs in substance use treatment to aid in HIV medication adherence.

Keywords

HIV/AIDS Medication adherence Substance use Coping Cocaine 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adam Gonzalez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Matthew J. Mimiaga
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jared Israel
    • 4
  • C. Andres Bedoya
    • 1
  • Steven A. Safren
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryMassachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral ScienceState University of New YorkStony BrookUSA
  3. 3.The Fenway InstituteBostonUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MissouriSt. LouisUSA