AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 16, Issue 5, pp 1203–1216

The Impact of a Brief Motivational Intervention on Unprotected Sex and Sex While High Among Drug-Positive Emergency Department Patients Who Receive STI/HIV VC/T and Drug Treatment Referral as Standard of Care

Authors

    • Department of Emergency MedicineBoston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center
    • Department of Community Health SciencesBoston University School of Public Health
  • Desiree Ashong
    • Department of Emergency MedicineBoston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center
    • Department of Community Health SciencesBoston University School of Public Health
  • Timothy Heeren
    • Department of BiostatisticsBoston University School of Public Health
  • Michael Winter
    • The Data Coordinating CenterBoston University School of Public Health
  • Caleb Bliss
    • The Data Coordinating CenterBoston University School of Public Health
  • Guillermo Madico
    • Department of Infectious DiseaseBoston University School of Medicine
  • Judith Bernstein
    • Department of Community Health SciencesBoston University School of Public Health
    • Department of Emergency MedicineBoston University School of Medicine
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-012-0134-0

Cite this article as:
Bernstein, E., Ashong, D., Heeren, T. et al. AIDS Behav (2012) 16: 1203. doi:10.1007/s10461-012-0134-0

Abstract

This randomized, controlled trial, conducted among out-of-treatment heroin/cocaine users at an emergency department visit, tests the impact on sexual risk of adding brief motivational intervention (B-MI) to point-of-service testing, counseling and drug treatment referral. 1,030 enrollees aged 18–54 received either voluntary counseling/testing (VC/T) with drug treatment referral, or VC/T, referral, and B-MI, delivered by an outreach worker. We measured number and proportion of non-protected sex acts (last 30 days) at 6 and 12 months (n = 802). At baseline, 70% of past-30-days sex acts were non-protected; 35% of sex acts occurred while high; 64% of sexual acts involved main, 24% casual and 12% transactional sex partners; 1.7% tested positive for an STI, and 8.8% for HIV. At six or 12 month follow-up, 20 enrollees tested positive for Chlamydia and/or Gonorrhea, and 6 enrollees HIV sero-converted. Self-reported high-risk behaviors declined in both groups with no significant between-group differences in behaviors or STI/HIV incidence.

Keywords

HIVEmergency departmentBrief motivational interventionSexual behavior risk

Supplementary material

10461_2012_134_MOESM1_ESM.docx (91 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 92 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012