AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 16, Issue 5, pp 1265–1275

Intervention Outcomes Among HIV-Affected Families Over 18 Months

Authors

    • Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Center for Community HealthUniversity of California Los Angeles
  • Eric Rice
    • School of Social WorkUniversity of Southern California
  • W. Scott Comulada
    • Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Center for Community HealthUniversity of California Los Angeles
  • Karin Best
    • Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Center for Community HealthUniversity of California Los Angeles
  • Carla Elia
    • Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Center for Community HealthUniversity of California Los Angeles
  • Katherine Peters
    • San Francisco Coordinating CenterUniversity of California San Francisco
  • Li Li
    • Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Center for Community HealthUniversity of California Los Angeles
  • Sara Green
    • Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Center for Community HealthUniversity of California Los Angeles
  • Ena Valladares
    • Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Center for Community HealthUniversity of California Los Angeles
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-011-0075-z

Cite this article as:
Rotheram-Borus, M.J., Rice, E., Comulada, W.S. et al. AIDS Behav (2012) 16: 1265. doi:10.1007/s10461-011-0075-z

Abstract

We evaluate the efficacy of a family-based intervention over time among HIV-affected families. Mothers living with HIV (MLH; n = 339) in Los Angeles and their school-aged children were randomized to either an intervention or control condition and followed for 18 months. MLH and their children in the intervention received 16 cognitive-behavioral, small-group sessions designed to help them maintain physical and mental health, parent while ill, address HIV-related stressors, and reduce HIV-transmission behaviors. At recruitment, MLH reported few problem behaviors related to physical health, mental health, or sexual or drug transmission acts. Compared to MLH in the control condition, intervention MLH were significantly more likely to monitor their own CD4 cell counts and their children were more likely to decrease alcohol and drug use. Most MLH and their children had relatively healthy family relationships. Family-based HIV interventions should be limited to MLH who are experiencing substantial problems.

Keywords

HIV+ mothersFamily interventionsParenting behaviorsSexual behaviorSubstance abuse

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011