AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 340–349

Age Cohort Differences in the Effects of Gay-Related Stigma, Anxiety and Identification with the Gay Community on Sexual Risk and Substance Use

  • Corina Lelutiu-Weinberger
  • John E. Pachankis
  • Sarit A. Golub
  • Ja’Nina J. Walker
  • Anthony J. Bamonte
  • Jeffrey T. Parsons
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-011-0070-4

Cite this article as:
Lelutiu-Weinberger, C., Pachankis, J.E., Golub, S.A. et al. AIDS Behav (2013) 17: 340. doi:10.1007/s10461-011-0070-4

Abstract

Different cohorts of gay/bisexual men experience unique developmental factors given their distinct socio-historical contexts. This study examined the moderating effects of age on three psychosocial predictors of HIV risk behavior and substance use. Analyses drew on data from a study of substance using HIV-negative and unknown status gay/bisexual men (N = 302) at risk for HIV infection. Anxiety was a strong independent predictor of sexual risk and substance use, and its effects on the sex risk outcomes were moderated by age, such that older and more anxious participants had more frequent instances of sexual risk. Identification with the gay community protected against HIV risk, and its effects on sex risk outcomes were moderated by age, such that younger participants who identified with the gay community reported less sexual risk. Understanding HIV risk within socio-historical contexts is essential in tailoring prevention by taking into account recipients' ages.

Keywords

Sexual risk Substance use Anxiety Stigma Gay community Gay and bisexual men 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Corina Lelutiu-Weinberger
    • 1
  • John E. Pachankis
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sarit A. Golub
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ja’Nina J. Walker
    • 5
  • Anthony J. Bamonte
    • 1
  • Jeffrey T. Parsons
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 6
    • 7
  1. 1.Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training (CHEST)New YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology, Ferkauf Graduate School of PsychologyYeshiva UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyHunter College, City University of New York (CUNY)New YorkUSA
  4. 4.Social & Personality Psychology Doctoral Subprogram, The Graduate CenterCUNYNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Center for AIDS Prevention, University of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  6. 6.CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter CollegeNew YorkUSA
  7. 7.Center for HIV Educational Studies and Training, Department of PsychologyHunter College of the City University of New YorkNew YorkUSA