AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 6, pp 1269–1278

Substance Use in HIV-Infected Women During Pregnancy: Self-Report Versus Meconium Analysis

  • Katherine Tassiopoulos
  • Jennifer S. Read
  • Susan Brogly
  • Kenneth Rich
  • Barry Lester
  • Stephen A. Spector
  • Ram Yogev
  • George R. SeageIII
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-010-9705-0

Cite this article as:
Tassiopoulos, K., Read, J.S., Brogly, S. et al. AIDS Behav (2010) 14: 1269. doi:10.1007/s10461-010-9705-0

Abstract

We evaluated prenatal substance use in a cohort of 480 HIV-infected women and their uninfected children. Substance use was reported by 29%; the most common substances reported were tobacco (18%), alcohol (10%), and marijuana (7.2%). Fewer than 4% of women reported cocaine or opiate use. Substance use was more common in the first trimester (25%) than the second (17%) and third (15%) (trend p-value <0.01), and was associated with race/ethnicity, education, birthplace, age and marital status. For 264 mother/infant pairs with meconium results, sensitivity of self-report was 86% for tobacco, 80% for marijuana and 67% for cocaine. Higher discordance between self-report and urine/blood toxicology was observed for cocaine, marijuana and opiates in a non-random subset of mothers/infants with these tests. Findings suggest reasonably complete self-reporting of substance use as confirmed by meconium analysis. Illicit substance use was low and substantially less than that reported in earlier studies of HIV-infected women, but alcohol and tobacco exposure was prevalent.

Keywords

Substance usePrenatal exposureMeconiumHIV

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine Tassiopoulos
    • 1
  • Jennifer S. Read
    • 2
  • Susan Brogly
    • 3
  • Kenneth Rich
    • 4
  • Barry Lester
    • 5
  • Stephen A. Spector
    • 6
  • Ram Yogev
    • 7
  • George R. SeageIII
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  2. 2.Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentNIHBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Center for Biostatistics in AIDS ResearchHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  5. 5.Center for the Study of Children at RiskThe Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Women and Infants HospitalProvidenceUSA
  6. 6.Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious DiseasesUniversity of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA
  7. 7.Section of Pediatric, Adolescent and Maternal HIV InfectionChildren’s Memorial HospitalChicagoUSA