AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 5, pp 1190–1197

Knowledge and Attitudes About Male Circumcision for HIV-1 Prevention among Heterosexual HIV-1 Serodiscordant Partnerships in Kampala, Uganda

  • Kenneth K. Mugwanya
  • Jared M. Baeten
  • Edith Nakku-Joloba
  • Elly Katabira
  • Connie Celum
  • Daniel Tisch
  • Christopher Whalen
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-010-9696-x

Cite this article as:
Mugwanya, K.K., Baeten, J.M., Nakku-Joloba, E. et al. AIDS Behav (2010) 14: 1190. doi:10.1007/s10461-010-9696-x

Abstract

Male circumcision for HIV-1 prevention will require high uptake among at-risk populations. 318 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Kampala, Uganda [155 (48.7%) with HIV-1 uninfected male partners] were interviewed about male circumcision for HIV-1 prevention. 77.1% of men and 89.6% of women were aware that circumcision reduces men’s risk for HIV-1 acquisition. Almost all understood the partial protective efficacy of circumcision for HIV-1 acquisition and lack of reduced HIV-1 transmission from circumcising HIV-1 infected men. Among couples with uncircumcised HIV-1 negative men (n = 92), 53.3% of men and 88.1% of female partners expressed interest in male circumcision. Previous discussion within the couple about circumcision for HIV-1 prevention was significantly associated with interest in the procedure. HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Uganda demonstrated a high level of understanding of the partial protective effect of male circumcision for HIV-1 prevention, but only half of HIV-1 uninfected uncircumcised men expressed interest in the procedure.

Keywords

Male circumcisionHIV-1 preventionKnowledge and attitudesHIV-1 discordant couplesUganda

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth K. Mugwanya
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jared M. Baeten
    • 3
  • Edith Nakku-Joloba
    • 4
  • Elly Katabira
    • 1
  • Connie Celum
    • 3
  • Daniel Tisch
    • 2
  • Christopher Whalen
    • 5
  1. 1.Infectious Diseases Institute, College of Health SciencesMakerere UniversityKampalaUganda
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of MedicineCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  3. 3.Departments of Global Health, Medicine, and EpidemiologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  4. 4.School of Public Health, College of Health SciencesMakerere UniversityKampalaUganda
  5. 5.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public HealthUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA