Original Paper

AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 5, pp 1207-1211

First online:

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

Framing Male Circumcision to Promote its Adoption in Different Settings

  • Franklin D. GilliamAffiliated withDepartments of Public Policy and Political Science, UCLA
  • , Ronald A. BrooksAffiliated withDepartment of Public Policy, UCLA School of Public AffairsCenter for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services, Semel Institute, UCLA Email author 
  • , Arleen A. LeibowitzAffiliated withDepartment of Public Policy, UCLA School of Public AffairsCenter for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services, Semel Institute, UCLA
  • , Lee E. KlosinskiAffiliated withDepartment of Public Policy, UCLA School of Public Affairs
  • , Sharif SawiresAffiliated withCenter for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services, Semel Institute, UCLAProgram in Global Health, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine
  • , Greg SzekeresAffiliated withProgram in Global Health, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine
  • , Mark WestonAffiliated withPolicy Consultant
  • , Thomas J. CoatesAffiliated withCenter for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services, Semel Institute, UCLAProgram in Global Health, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine

Abstract

The effectiveness of male circumcision in preventing transmission of HIV from females to males has been established. Those who are now advocating its widespread use face many challenges in convincing policy-makers and the public of circumcision’s value. We suggest that frames are a useful lens for communicating public health messages that may help promote adoption of circumcision. Frames relate to how individuals and societies perceive and understand the world. Existing frames are often hard to shift, and should be borne in mind by advocates and program implementers as they attempt to promote male circumcision by invoking new frames. Frames differ across and within societies, and advocates must find ways of delivering resonant messages that take into account prior perceptions and use the most appropriate means of communicating the benefits and value of male circumcision to different audiences.

Keywords

Male circumcision HIV prevention Implementation Communication tools Frames Africa Latin America The Caribbean