AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 493–503

Randomized Trial of the Effects of Housing Assistance on the Health and Risk Behaviors of Homeless and Unstably Housed People Living with HIV

  • Richard J. Wolitski
  • Daniel P. Kidder
  • Sherri L. Pals
  • Scott Royal
  • Angela Aidala
  • Ron Stall
  • David R. Holtgrave
  • David Harre
  • Cari Courtenay-Quirk
  • for the Housing and Health Study Team
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-009-9643-x

Cite this article as:
Wolitski, R.J., Kidder, D.P., Pals, S.L. et al. AIDS Behav (2010) 14: 493. doi:10.1007/s10461-009-9643-x

Abstract

Homelessness affects HIV risk and health, but little is known about the longitudinal effects of rental assistance on the housing status and health of homeless and unstably housed people living with HIV/AIDS. Homeless/unstably housed people living with HIV/AIDS (N = 630) were randomly assigned to immediate Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) rental assistance or customary care. Self-reported data, CD4, and HIV viral load were collected at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Results showed that housing status improved in both groups, with greater improvement occurring in the treatment group. At 18 months, 51% of the comparison group had their own housing, limiting statistical power. Intent-to-treat analyses demonstrated significant reductions in medical care utilization and improvements in self-reported physical and mental health; significant differential change benefiting the treatment group was observed for depression and perceived stress. Significant differences between homeless and stably housed participants were found in as-treated analyses for health care utilization, mental health, and physical health. HOPWA rental assistance improves housing status and, in some cases, health outcomes of homeless and unstably housed people living with HIV/AIDS.

Keywords

HousingHomeless personsHIV seropositivityHealth statusMental healthHealth services accessibilityRandomized controlled trialSexual behavior

Copyright information

© GovernmentEmployee: Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard J. Wolitski
    • 1
  • Daniel P. Kidder
    • 1
  • Sherri L. Pals
    • 1
  • Scott Royal
    • 2
  • Angela Aidala
    • 3
  • Ron Stall
    • 4
  • David R. Holtgrave
    • 5
  • David Harre
    • 6
  • Cari Courtenay-Quirk
    • 1
  • for the Housing and Health Study Team
  1. 1.Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Abt AssociatesBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.School of Public HealthUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  5. 5.Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  6. 6.Department of Housing and Urban DevelopmentWashingtonUSA