Original Paper

AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 580-589

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

Using Electronic Drug Monitor Feedback to Improve Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Among HIV-Positive Patients in China

  • Lora L. SabinAffiliated withCenter for International Health and Development, Boston UniversityDepartment of International Health, Center for International Health and Development, Boston University School of Public Health Email author 
  • , Mary Bachman DeSilvaAffiliated withCenter for International Health and Development, Boston UniversityDepartment of International Health, Center for International Health and Development, Boston University School of Public Health
  • , Davidson H. HamerAffiliated withCenter for International Health and Development, Boston UniversityDepartment of International Health, Center for International Health and Development, Boston University School of Public HealthInfectious Diseases Section, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine
  • , Keyi XuAffiliated withDepartment of STDs and Dermatology, Ditan Hospital
  • , Jianbo ZhangAffiliated withDepartment of STDs and Dermatology, Dali Second People’s Hospital
  • , Tao LiAffiliated withBoston University School of Public Health
  • , Ira B. WilsonAffiliated withInstitute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts New England Medical Center
  • , Christopher J. GillAffiliated withNovartis Vaccines

Abstract

Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) requires excellent adherence. Little is known about how to improve ART adherence in many HIV/AIDS-affected countries, including China. We therefore assessed an adherence intervention among HIV-positive patients in southwestern China. Eighty subjects were enrolled and monitored for 6 months. Sixty-eight remaining subjects were randomized to intervention/control arms. In months 7–12, intervention subjects were counseled using EDM feedback; controls continued with standard of care. Among randomized subjects, mean adherence and CD4 count were 86.8 vs. 83.8% and 297 vs. 357 cells/μl in intervention vs. control subjects, respectively. At month 12, among 64 subjects who completed the trial, mean adherence had risen significantly among intervention subjects to 96.5% but remained unchanged in controls. Mean CD4 count rose by 90 cells/μl and declined by 9 cells/μl among intervention and control subjects, respectively. EDM feedback as a counseling tool appears promising for management of HIV and other chronic diseases.

Keywords

AIDS Medication adherence Antiretroviral medication China Electronic drug monitoring