AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 504–517

Brief and Intensive Behavioral Interventions to Promote Sexual Risk Reduction among STD Clinic Patients: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

  • Michael P. Carey
  • Theresa E. Senn
  • Peter A. Vanable
  • Patricia Coury-Doniger
  • Marguerite A. Urban
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-009-9587-1

Cite this article as:
Carey, M.P., Senn, T.E., Vanable, P.A. et al. AIDS Behav (2010) 14: 504. doi:10.1007/s10461-009-9587-1

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the separate and combined effectiveness of brief and intensive interventions for sexual risk reduction among patients at a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic. Patients (N =1483; 54% men; 64% African-American; M = 29.2 years old) were recruited from a publicly funded, walk-in STD clinic. Patients completed a baseline assessment, and then were randomized to one of six intervention arms; each arm combined a brief intervention with an intensive intervention. The interventions provided different levels of information, motivational counseling, and behavioral skills training, guided by theory, formative research, and empiric precedent. Follow-up assessments, including STD screening, occurred at 3, 6, and 12 months post-intervention. The results showed that infection rates declined from 18.1% at baseline to 4.5% at 12 months. At a 3-month follow-up, patients reported fewer sexual partners, fewer episodes of unprotected sex, and a lower percentage of unprotected sexual events; they strengthened sexual health knowledge, safer sex attitudes and intentions, and self-efficacy beliefs. No consistent pattern of differential risk reduction was observed among the six intervention conditions, nor was any evidence of decay from 3 to 12-month follow-ups obtained. We conclude that implementing behavioral interventions in a STD clinic was associated with significant reduction of sexual risk behavior and risk antecedents.

Keywords

Randomized controlled trialSexual risk reductionHIV preventionBehaviorSexually transmitted disease

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael P. Carey
    • 1
  • Theresa E. Senn
    • 1
  • Peter A. Vanable
    • 1
  • Patricia Coury-Doniger
    • 2
  • Marguerite A. Urban
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Health and BehaviorSyracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA
  2. 2.School of MedicineUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA