Original paper

AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 13, Issue 6, pp 1054-1060

First online:

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

Behavior Change Following Diagnosis with Acute/Early HIV Infection—A Move to Serosorting with Other HIV-Infected Individuals. The NIMH Multisite Acute HIV Infection Study: III

  • Wayne T. StewardAffiliated withCenter for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco Email author 
  • , Robert H. RemienAffiliated withHIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University
  • , Jenny A. HigginsAffiliated withCenter for Health and Wellbeing, Princeton University
  • , Robert DubrowAffiliated withCenter for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS, Yale University
  • , Steven D. PinkertonAffiliated withCenter for AIDS Intervention Research, Medical College of Wisconsin
  • , Kathleen J. SikkemaAffiliated withDuke University
  • , Hong-Ha M. TruongAffiliated withCenter for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco
  • , Mallory O. JohnsonAffiliated withCenter for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco
  • , Jennifer HirschAffiliated withHIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University
    • , Ronald A. BrooksAffiliated withCenter for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Services, University of California
    • , Stephen F. MorinAffiliated withCenter for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco

Abstract

Risk reductions behaviors are especially important during acute/early HIV infection, a period of high transmission risk. We examined how sexual behaviors changed following diagnosis of acute/early HIV infection. Twenty-eight individuals completed structured surveys and in-depth interviews shortly after learning of their infection and 2 months later. Quantitative analyses revealed significant changes after diagnosis, including reductions in total partners and decreases in the proportion of unprotected sex acts occurring with uninfected partners (serosorting). Qualitative findings indicated that these changes were motivated by concerns about infecting others. However, participants were less successful at increasing the frequency with which they used condoms. These results suggest that the initial diagnosis with HIV may constitute an important component of interventions to promote risk reduction during the acute/early stages of the disease.

Keywords

Acute HIV Serosorting Behavior change HIV prevention