AIDS and Behavior

, 13:1046

Lack of Understanding of Acute HIV Infection among Newly-Infected Persons—Implications for Prevention and Public Health: The NIMH Multisite Acute HIV Infection Study: II

  • Robert H. Remien
  • Jenny A. Higgins
  • Jackie Correale
  • Jose Bauermeister
  • Robert Dubrow
  • Mark Bradley
  • Wayne T. Steward
  • David W. Seal
  • Kathleen J. Sikkema
  • Peter R. Kerndt
  • Kenneth H. Mayer
  • Hong-Ha M. Truong
  • Corinna Young Casey
  • Anke A. Ehrhardt
  • Stephen F. Morin
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-009-9581-7

Cite this article as:
Remien, R.H., Higgins, J.A., Correale, J. et al. AIDS Behav (2009) 13: 1046. doi:10.1007/s10461-009-9581-7

Abstract

Acute/early HIV infection is a period of high HIV transmission. Consequently, early detection of HIV infection and targeted HIV prevention could prevent a significant proportion of new transmissions. As part of an NIMH-funded multisite study, we used in-depth interviews to explore understandings of acute HIV infection (AHI) among 34 individuals diagnosed with acute/early HIV infection in six US cities. We found a marked lack of awareness of AHI-related acute retroviral symptoms and a lack of clarity about AHI testing methods. Most participants knew little about the meaning and/or consequences of AHI, particularly that it is a period of elevated infectiousness. Over time and after the acute stage of infection, many participants acquired understanding of AHI from varied sources, including the Internet, HIV-infected friends, and health clinic employees. There is a need to promote targeted education about AHI to reduce the rapid spread of HIV associated with acute/early infection within communities at risk for HIV.

Keywords

HIV/AIDSAwarenessAcute HIVHIV prevention

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert H. Remien
    • 1
  • Jenny A. Higgins
    • 1
  • Jackie Correale
    • 1
  • Jose Bauermeister
    • 1
  • Robert Dubrow
    • 2
  • Mark Bradley
    • 1
  • Wayne T. Steward
    • 3
  • David W. Seal
    • 4
  • Kathleen J. Sikkema
    • 5
  • Peter R. Kerndt
    • 6
  • Kenneth H. Mayer
    • 7
  • Hong-Ha M. Truong
    • 3
  • Corinna Young Casey
    • 8
  • Anke A. Ehrhardt
    • 1
  • Stephen F. Morin
    • 3
  1. 1.HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, New York State Psychiatric InstituteColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDSYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Center for AIDS Prevention StudiesUniversity of California San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.Center for AIDS Intervention ResearchMedical College of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA
  5. 5.Duke UniversityDurhamUSA
  6. 6.Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Sexually Transmitted Disease ProgramLos AngelesUSA
  7. 7.Brown University/The Miriam HospitalProvidenceUSA
  8. 8.HIV Neurobehavioral Research CenterUniversity of California San DiegoSan DiegoUSA