Original Paper

AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 340-346

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

Impact of Prison Status on HIV-Related Risk Behaviors

  • Angela L. HudsonAffiliated withSchool of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles
  • , Adeline NyamathiAffiliated withSchool of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles Email author 
  • , Debika BhattacharyaAffiliated withDivision of Infectious Diseases, University of California, Los Angeles
  • , Elizabeth MarlowAffiliated withSchool of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles
  • , Steven ShoptawAffiliated withFamily Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles
  • , Mary MarfiseeAffiliated withFamily Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles
  • , Barbara LeakeAffiliated withSchool of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles

Abstract

Baseline data were collected to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions on completion of the hepatitis A and B vaccine series among 664 sheltered and street-based homeless adults who were: (a) homeless; (b) recently (<1 year) discharged from prison; (c) discharged 1 year or more; and (d) never incarcerated. Group differences at baseline were assessed for socio–demographic characteristics, drug and alcohol use, sexual activity, mental health and public assistance. More than one-third of homeless persons (38%) reported prison time and 16% of the sample had been recently discharged from prison. Almost half of persons who were discharged from prison at least 1 year ago reported daily use of drugs and alcohol over the past 6 months compared to about 1 in 5 among those who were recently released from prison. As risk for HCV and HIV co-infection continues among homeless ex-offenders, HIV/HCV prevention efforts are needed for this population.

Keywords

Homeless History of incarceration HIV HBV