AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 13, Supplement 1, pp 20–27

Fertility Intentions of HIV-1 Infected and Uninfected Women in Malawi: A Longitudinal Study

  • Frank Taulo
  • Mark Berry
  • Amy Tsui
  • Bonus Makanani
  • George Kafulafula
  • Qing Li
  • Chiwawa Nkhoma
  • Johnstone J. Kumwenda
  • Newton Kumwenda
  • Taha E. Taha
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-009-9547-9

Cite this article as:
Taulo, F., Berry, M., Tsui, A. et al. AIDS Behav (2009) 13: 20. doi:10.1007/s10461-009-9547-9

Abstract

This study aimed to determine changes in fertility intentions of HIV-1 infected and uninfected reproductive age women in Blantyre, Malawi. Participants were asked about their fertility intentions at baseline and at 3-month visits for 1 year. Time-to-event statistical models were used to determine factors associated with changes in fertility intentions. Overall, 842 HIV uninfected and 844 HIV infected women were enrolled. The hazard of changing from wanting no more children at baseline to wanting more children at follow-up was 61% lower among HIV infected women compared to HIV uninfected women (P < 0.01) after adjusting for other factors, while HIV infected women were ~3 times more likely to change to wanting no more children. The overall pregnancy rate after 12 months was 14.9 per 100 person-years and did not differ among 102 HIV uninfected and 100 infected women who became pregnant. HIV infection is a significant predictor of fertility intentions over time.

Keywords

Family planningFertility intentionsHIV-1 infectionMalawiPregnancy

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Taulo
    • 1
  • Mark Berry
    • 2
  • Amy Tsui
    • 3
  • Bonus Makanani
    • 1
  • George Kafulafula
    • 1
  • Qing Li
    • 2
  • Chiwawa Nkhoma
    • 4
  • Johnstone J. Kumwenda
    • 5
  • Newton Kumwenda
    • 6
  • Taha E. Taha
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of MedicineUniversity of MalawiBlantyreMalawi
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public HealthJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, Bloomberg School of Public HealthJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  4. 4.Johns Hopkins University—University of Malawi College of Medicine Research ProjectBlantyreMalawi
  5. 5.Department of Medicine, College of MedicineUniversity of MalawiBlantyreMalawi
  6. 6.Department of EpidemiologyBloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA