AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 639–648

An Exploratory Behavioral Intervention Trial to Improve Rates of Screening for AIDS Clinical Trials Among Racial/Ethnic Minority and Female Persons Living with HIV/AIDS

Authors

    • Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR)National Development and Research Institutes, Inc. (NDRI)
  • Keith Cylar
    • Housing Works, Inc.
  • Noelle R. Leonard
    • Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR)National Development and Research Institutes, Inc. (NDRI)
  • Marion Riedel
    • Columbia University School of Social Work
  • Nina Herzog
    • Independent consultant
  • Gricel N. Arredondo
    • Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR)National Development and Research Institutes, Inc. (NDRI)
  • Charles M. Cleland
    • Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR)National Development and Research Institutes, Inc. (NDRI)
  • Michael Aguirre
    • Division of Infectious DiseasesBeth Israel Medical Center
  • Ann Marshak
    • Division of Infectious DiseasesBeth Israel Medical Center
  • Donna Mildvan
    • Division of Infectious DiseasesBeth Israel Medical Center
  • The Project ACT Collaborative Study Team
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-009-9539-9

Cite this article as:
Gwadz, M.V., Cylar, K., Leonard, N.R. et al. AIDS Behav (2010) 14: 639. doi:10.1007/s10461-009-9539-9

Abstract

Individuals from racial/ethnic minority backgrounds and women have not been proportionately represented in AIDS clinical trials (ACTs). There have been few intervention efforts to eliminate this health disparity. This paper reports on a brief behavioral intervention to increase rates of screening for ACTs in these groups. The study was exploratory and used a single-group pre/posttest design. A total of 580 persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) were recruited (39% female; 56% African-American, 32% Latino/Hispanic). The intervention was efficacious: 25% attended screening. We identified the primary junctures where PLHA are lost in the screening process. Both group intervention sessions and an individual contact were associated with screening. Findings provide preliminary support for the intervention’s efficacy and the utility of combining group and individual intervention formats. Interventions of greater duration and intensity, and which address multiple levels of influence (e.g., social, structural), may be needed to increase screening rates further.

Keywords

HIV/AIDS clinical trialsBehavioral interventionScreeningGender disparitiesRacial/ethnic disparitiesMotivational interviewing

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009