AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 371–378

Clinical Correlates of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders in South Africa

Authors

    • Department of Psychiatry and Mental HealthUniversity of Cape Town, South Africa
  • Dylan S. Fincham
    • MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Stellenbosch
  • Dan J. Stein
    • Department of Psychiatry and Mental HealthUniversity of Cape Town, South Africa
  • Robert H. Paul
    • Department of Psychology and Behavioral NeuroscienceUniversity of Missouri
  • Soraya Seedat
    • MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Stellenbosch
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-009-9538-x

Cite this article as:
Joska, J.A., Fincham, D.S., Stein, D.J. et al. AIDS Behav (2010) 14: 371. doi:10.1007/s10461-009-9538-x

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) occurs globally and across different genetic clades of the virus. However, few studies have examined HAND in South Africa, despite the prevalence of HIV in this region of the world, and the predominance of clade C. The present study examined the relationship between a number of demographic and clinical variables in a sample of 536 patients attending HIV clinics in South Africa. HAND was present in 23.5% of the sample and was associated with older age, a low educational level among those with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol abuse among those with many months since diagnosis. These results suggest that HAND is common among patients in South Africa, and is associated with clinical variables such as PTSD and alcohol abuse. This underlines the impact of HIV on the nervous system and the importance of screening for co morbid mental health conditions.

Keywords

HIV-associated neurocognitive disordersHIV Dementia Scale (HDS)South AfricaAlcohol abusePost-traumatic stress disorder

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009