AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 474–487

Effects of an Internet-Based Intervention for HIV Prevention: The Youthnet Trials

Authors

    • Colorado Health Outcomes ProgramUniversity of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
    • Community and Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public HealthUniversity of Colorado Denver
  • Katherine Pratte
    • Colorado Health Outcomes ProgramUniversity of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
    • American Indian and Alaska Natives ProgramUniversity of Colorado Denver
  • Nancy Whitesell
    • American Indian and Alaska Natives ProgramUniversity of Colorado Denver
  • Cornelis Rietmeijer
    • Community and Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public HealthUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Denver Public Health DepartmentDenver Health and Hospital Authority
  • Mary McFarlane
    • Division of STD PreventionCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-008-9487-9

Cite this article as:
Bull, S., Pratte, K., Whitesell, N. et al. AIDS Behav (2009) 13: 474. doi:10.1007/s10461-008-9487-9

Abstract

Youth use the Internet and computers in unprecedented numbers. We have yet to identify interventions that can reach and retain large numbers of diverse youth online and demonstrate HIV prevention efficacy. We tested a single session condom promotion Internet intervention for 18–24 year olds in two RCTs: one sample recruited online and one recruited in clinics. All study elements were carried out on the Internet. Using repeated measures structural equation models we analyzed change in proportion of sex acts protected by condoms (PPA) over time. Among sexually active youth in the Internet sample, persons exposed to the intervention had very slight increases in condom norms, and this was the only factor impacting PPA. We saw no intervention effects in the clinic sample. Internet-based interventions need to be more intensive to see greater effects. We need to do more to reach high risk youth online and keep their attention for multiple sessions.

Keywords

Internet and HIV preventionRandomized controlled trialHIV prevention and youthTechnology-based HIV prevention

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008