AIDS and Behavior

, 13:1097

Changes in Risk Behavior Among HIV-Positive Patients During Their First Year of Antiretroviral Therapy in Cape Town South Africa

Authors

    • Department of International Health and DevelopmentTulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
  • Catherine Mathews
    • Health Systems Research Unit, Medical Research Council
    • School of Public Health and Family MedicineUniversity of Cape Town
  • Mickey Chopra
    • Health Systems Research Unit, Medical Research Council
    • School of Public HealthUniversity of the Western Cape
  • Mark N. Lurie
    • Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
  • Lisanne Brown
    • Department of International Health and DevelopmentTulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
  • Sarah Dewing
    • Health Systems Research Unit, Medical Research Council
  • Carl Kendall
    • Department of International Health and DevelopmentTulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-008-9473-2

Cite this article as:
Eisele, T.P., Mathews, C., Chopra, M. et al. AIDS Behav (2009) 13: 1097. doi:10.1007/s10461-008-9473-2

Abstract

We explore changes in sexual risk behaviour over the first year of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among a cohort of patients in Cape Town South Africa initiating treatment in five public facilities in 2006 and again 1 year later (Time 1 and Time 2). Contemporaneous measures of unprotected sex were also obtained from 2 cross-sectional samples of HIV-positive patients waiting to start ART attending the same facilities. Unprotected sex at last sex among patients on ART decreased significantly from a baseline of 44.7–23.2% one year later, regardless of partner status. After controlling for confounding factors, the observed decrease in unprotected sex among the ART cohort was highly significant in relation to the 2 cross-sectional samples of patients at Time 1 and Time 2 waiting to initiate ART. Findings suggest it is critical to start positive prevention to decrease risky sexual behavior prior to the start of ART within this setting.

Keywords

HIV/AIDSAntiretroviral therapySexual risk behaviorSouth AfricaPeople living with HIV/AIDS

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008