AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 399–408

Common Factors in Effective HIV Prevention Programs

  • Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus
  • Dallas Swendeman
  • Diane Flannery
  • Eric Rice
  • David M. Adamson
  • Barbara Ingram
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-008-9464-3

Cite this article as:
Rotheram-Borus, M.J., Swendeman, D., Flannery, D. et al. AIDS Behav (2009) 13: 399. doi:10.1007/s10461-008-9464-3

Abstract

We propose a set of common factors in evidence-based interventions (EBI) for HIV prevention, which cut across theoretical models of behavior change. Three existing literatures support this agenda: (1) Common factors in psychotherapy; (2) core elements from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention EBIs; and (3) component analyses of EBI. To stimulate discussion among prevention researchers, we propose a set of common factors at the highest level of abstraction that describe what all effective programs do: (1) establish a framework to understand behavior change; (2) convey issue-specific and population-specific information necessary for healthy actions; (3) build cognitive, affective, and behavioral self-management skills; (4) address environmental barriers to implementing health behaviors; and (5) provide tools to develop ongoing social and community support for healthy actions. A focus on common factors will enhance research on new HIV prevention interventions, encourage collaboration among researchers, provide guidelines for adapting EBI, and simplify and speed the adoption of EBI for providers.

Keywords

Common factors Core elements Effective HIV prevention programs HIV prevention interventions Evidence-based interventions 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus
    • 1
  • Dallas Swendeman
    • 1
  • Diane Flannery
    • 1
  • Eric Rice
    • 2
  • David M. Adamson
    • 3
  • Barbara Ingram
    • 4
  1. 1.UCLA Global Center for Children and Families, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human BehaviorUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Center for Community Health, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human BehaviorUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.RAND CorporationPittsburghUSA
  4. 4.Pepperdine UniversityMalibuUSA