AIDS and Behavior

, 13:1005

Lessons Learned from “Integrating” Intensive Family-based Interventions into Medical Care Settings for Mothers Living with HIV/AIDS and their Adolescent Children

Authors

    • Center for Community Health, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human BehaviorUniversity of California at Los Angeles
  • Patricia Lester
    • Center for Community Health, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human BehaviorUniversity of California at Los Angeles
  • Lisa Flook
    • Center for Community Health, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human BehaviorUniversity of California at Los Angeles
  • Sara Green
    • Center for Community Health, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human BehaviorUniversity of California at Los Angeles
  • Ena S. Valladares
    • Center for Community Health, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human BehaviorUniversity of California at Los Angeles
  • Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus
    • Center for Community Health, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human BehaviorUniversity of California at Los Angeles
Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-008-9417-x

Cite this article as:
Rice, E., Lester, P., Flook, L. et al. AIDS Behav (2009) 13: 1005. doi:10.1007/s10461-008-9417-x

Abstract

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended integrating behavioral interventions into medical care settings for persons living with HIV. Delivering an intensive, family-based intervention for mothers living with HIV (MLH) (n = 173) and their adolescent children (n = 116) integrated into medical care was problematic. Despite the fact that nearly half of MLH were recruited at HIV/AIDS clinics, community centers and children’s hospitals were the most popular and most successful sites for the delivery of the intervention. We provide recommendations for how to integrate intensive interventions into medical care, given the needs of MLH, their adolescents, and the organizations serving them.

Keywords

Integrating interventions to medical careHIV/AIDSSecondary HIV preventionPersons living with HIVFamily

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008