AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 374–383

Common Processes in Evidence-Based Adolescent HIV Prevention Programs

  • Barbara L. Ingram
  • Diane Flannery
  • Amy Elkavich
  • Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-008-9369-1

Cite this article as:
Ingram, B.L., Flannery, D., Elkavich, A. et al. AIDS Behav (2008) 12: 374. doi:10.1007/s10461-008-9369-1

Abstract

Dissemination of evidence-based HIV prevention programs for adolescents will be increased if community interventionists are able to distinguish core, essential program elements from optional, discretionary ones. We selected five successful adolescent HIV prevention programs, used a qualitative coding method to identify common processes described in the procedural manuals, and then compared the programs. Nineteen common processes were categorized as structural features, group management strategies, competence building, and addressing developmental challenges of adolescence. All programs shared the same structural features (goal-setting and session agendas), used an active engagement style of group management, and built cognitive competence. Programs varied in attention to developmental challenges, emphasis on behavioral and emotional competence, and group management methods. This qualitative analysis demonstrated that successful HIV programs contain processes not articulated in their developers’ theoretical models. By moving from the concrete specifics of branded interventions to identification of core, common processes, we are consistent with the progress of “common factors” research in psychotherapy.

Keywords

Evidence-based adolescent HIV prevention interventions Common processes Core elements HIV Structural and procedural practices Qualitative analysis 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara L. Ingram
    • 1
  • Diane Flannery
    • 2
  • Amy Elkavich
    • 2
  • Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Education and PsychologyPepperdine UniversityLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Center for Community HealthUniversity of California at Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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