AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 12, Issue 5, pp 729–740

A Daily Process Investigation of Alcohol-involved Sexual Risk Behavior Among Economically Disadvantaged Problem Drinkers Living with HIV/AIDS

Authors

    • Department of Psychology, Center for Health, Intervention, and PreventionUniversity of Connecticut
    • Department of Psychology, Center for Health, Intervention, and PreventionUniversity of Connecticut
  • David B. Portnoy
    • Department of Psychology, Center for Health, Intervention, and PreventionUniversity of Connecticut
  • Susan M. Kiene
    • Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of MedicineBrown University
  • Howard Tennen
    • Department of Community Medicine and Health CareUniversity of Connecticut Health Center
  • Khamis S. Abu-Hasaballah
    • General Clinical Research CenterUniversity of Connecticut Health Center
  • Rebecca Ferrer
    • Department of Psychology, Center for Health, Intervention, and PreventionUniversity of Connecticut
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-007-9342-4

Cite this article as:
Barta, W.D., Portnoy, D.B., Kiene, S.M. et al. AIDS Behav (2008) 12: 729. doi:10.1007/s10461-007-9342-4

Abstract

Alcohol use is believed to increase sexual risk behavior among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). As drinking and sexual risk acts often occur in the same social contexts, this association is difficult to confirm. In this study, electronic daily diaries were completed by 116 PLWHA over 5 weeks. This yielded a total of 1,464 records consisting of data pertaining to discrete occasions of anal and vaginal sex. Simultaneous within- and between-person multilevel analyses were conducted, including situational variables (partner type, partner serostatus, partner drinking) and individual difference variables (gender, level of alcohol dependence). The resulting model explains 27.5% of the variance and reveals that interactions among these situational and individual difference variables predict changes in the estimated rate of unprotected sex (US). Also, in defined contexts, the amount of alcohol consumed prior to sex significantly affects the rate of US among members of the sample. Implications are discussed.

Keywords

Interactive Voice ResponseCondom useHIV-positiveDaily process approachAlcohol

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007