Original Research

AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 10-22

First online:

Adherence to Antiretroviral Medication Regimens: A Test of a Psychosocial Model

  • Colleen DiIorioAffiliated withDepartment of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University Email author 
  • , Frances McCartyAffiliated withDepartment of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University
  • , Lara DePadillaAffiliated withDepartment of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University
  • , Ken ResnicowAffiliated withHealth Behavior & Health Education School of Public Health, University of Michigan
  • , Marcia McDonnell HolstadAffiliated withNell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University
  • , Katherine YeagerAffiliated withDepartment of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University
  • , Sanjay M. SharmaAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine
  • , Donald E. MoriskyAffiliated withDepartment of Community Health Sciences, UCLA School of Public Health
  • , Brita LundbergAffiliated with

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

Objective The primary aim of this study was to test a psychosocial model of medication adherence among people taking antiretroviral medications. This model was based primarily on social cognitive theory and included personal (self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, stigma, depression, and spirituality), social (social support, difficult life circumstances), and provider (patient satisfaction and decision-making) variables. Design The data for this analysis were obtained from the parent study, which was a randomized controlled trial (Get Busy Living) designed to evaluate an intervention to foster medication adherence. Factor analysis was used to develop the constructs for the model, and structural equation modeling was used to test the model. Only baseline data were used in this cross sectional analysis. Methods Participants were recruited from a HIV/AIDS clinic in Atlanta, GA. Prior to group assignment, participants were asked to complete a questionnaire that included assessment of the study variables. Results A total of 236 participants were included in the analysis. The mean age of the participants was 41 years; the majority were male, and most were African-American. In the final model, self-efficacy and depression demonstrated direct associations with adherence; whereas stigma, patient satisfaction, and social support were indirectly related to adherence through their association with either self-efficacy or depression. Conclusion These findings provide evidence to reinforce the belief that medication-taking behaviors are affected by a complex set of interactions among psychosocial variables and provide direction for adherence interventions.

Keywords

AIDS Medication adherence Antiretroviral medication