AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 86–94

Optimal Recall Period and Response Task for Self-Reported HIV Medication Adherence

Authors

  • Minyi Lu
    • Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Department of MedicineTufts-New England Medical Center
  • Steven A. Safren
    • Department of PsychologyMassachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Fenway Community Health Center
  • Paul R. Skolnik
    • Center for HIV/AIDS Care and ResearchBoston University Medical Center
  • William H. Rogers
    • Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Department of MedicineTufts-New England Medical Center
  • William Coady
    • Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Department of MedicineTufts-New England Medical Center
  • Helene Hardy
    • Center for HIV/AIDS Care and ResearchBoston University Medical Center
    • Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Department of MedicineTufts-New England Medical Center
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-007-9261-4

Cite this article as:
Lu, M., Safren, S.A., Skolnik, P.R. et al. AIDS Behav (2008) 12: 86. doi:10.1007/s10461-007-9261-4

Abstract

Self-reported measures of antiretroviral adherence vary greatly in recall time periods and response tasks. To determine which time frame is most accurate, we compared 3-, 7-day, and 1-month self-reports with data from medication event monitoring system (MEMS). To determine which response task is most accurate we compared three different 1-month self-report tasks (frequency, percent, and rating) to MEMS. We analyzed 643 study visits made by 156 participants. Over-reporting (self-report minus MEMS) was significantly less for the 1-month recall period (9%) than for the 3 (17%) or 7-day (14%) periods. Over-reporting was significantly less for the 1-month rating task (3%) than for the 1-month frequency and percent tasks (both 12%). We conclude that 1-month recall periods may be more accurate than 3- or 7-day periods, and that items that ask respondents to rate their adherence may be more accurate than those that ask about frequencies or percents.

Keywords

Patient complianceHIV infectionHIV infection/drug therapyQuestionnaires

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007