AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 86–94

Optimal Recall Period and Response Task for Self-Reported HIV Medication Adherence

  • Minyi Lu
  • Steven A. Safren
  • Paul R. Skolnik
  • William H. Rogers
  • William Coady
  • Helene Hardy
  • Ira B. Wilson
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-007-9261-4

Cite this article as:
Lu, M., Safren, S.A., Skolnik, P.R. et al. AIDS Behav (2008) 12: 86. doi:10.1007/s10461-007-9261-4

Abstract

Self-reported measures of antiretroviral adherence vary greatly in recall time periods and response tasks. To determine which time frame is most accurate, we compared 3-, 7-day, and 1-month self-reports with data from medication event monitoring system (MEMS). To determine which response task is most accurate we compared three different 1-month self-report tasks (frequency, percent, and rating) to MEMS. We analyzed 643 study visits made by 156 participants. Over-reporting (self-report minus MEMS) was significantly less for the 1-month recall period (9%) than for the 3 (17%) or 7-day (14%) periods. Over-reporting was significantly less for the 1-month rating task (3%) than for the 1-month frequency and percent tasks (both 12%). We conclude that 1-month recall periods may be more accurate than 3- or 7-day periods, and that items that ask respondents to rate their adherence may be more accurate than those that ask about frequencies or percents.

Keywords

Patient compliance HIV infection HIV infection/drug therapy Questionnaires 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Minyi Lu
    • 1
  • Steven A. Safren
    • 2
  • Paul R. Skolnik
    • 3
  • William H. Rogers
    • 1
  • William Coady
    • 1
  • Helene Hardy
    • 3
  • Ira B. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Department of MedicineTufts-New England Medical CenterBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyMassachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Fenway Community Health CenterBostonUSA
  3. 3.Center for HIV/AIDS Care and ResearchBoston University Medical CenterBostonUSA

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