Original Paper

AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 11, Issue 6, pp 927-935

First online:

Pregnancy Decisions Among Women with HIV

  • Shonda M. CraftAffiliated withDepartment of Human Development and Family Science, The Ohio State University Email author 
  • , Robin O. DelaneyAffiliated withDepartment of Human Development and Family Science, The Ohio State University
  • , Dianne T. BautistaAffiliated withDepartment of Statistics, The Ohio State University
  • , Julianne M. SerovichAffiliated withDepartment of Human Development and Family Science, The Ohio State University

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Abstract

Nearly 80% of women currently infected with HIV are of childbearing age. As women of childbearing age continue to be at risk of contracting HIV, there will be an increased need for choices about whether or not to have biological children. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the influence of partners, physicians, and family members on pregnancy decisions, as well as the impact of HIV stigma on these decisions. Results indicated that most women chose not to become pregnant since learning their HIV diagnosis and the woman’s age at the time of diagnosis is significantly associated with this decision. Additional factors included fear of transmitting HIV to their child, personal health-related concerns, and desire to have children. Women with a procreative inclination were more likely to choose to become pregnant which outweighed social support and personal health concerns. Implications and suggestions for future research are noted.

Keywords

HIV positive Pregnancy decisions Stigma Women