AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 11, Issue 6, pp 897–904

Initiating HIV Care: Attitudes and Perceptions of HIV Positive Crack Cocaine Users

  • Toye H. Brewer
  • Wei Zhao
  • Margaret Pereyra
  • Carlos del Rio
  • Anita Loughlin
  • Pamela Anderson-Mahoney
  • Lytt Gardner
  • Lisa R. Metsch
  • for the ARTAS Study Group
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-007-9210-2

Cite this article as:
Brewer, T.H., Zhao, W., Pereyra, M. et al. AIDS Behav (2007) 11: 897. doi:10.1007/s10461-007-9210-2

Abstract

There is limited data on the initiation and use of HIV care services by HIV-positive crack cocaine users. We analyzed data from a study of 286 recently infected HIV-positive persons recruited from 4 U.S. cities. Participants completed an Audio Computer Assisted Self Interview (A-CASI) regarding HIV care knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices related to the initiation of HIV care. In multiple logistic regression analysis, higher scores on an assessment of knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding HIV care, and Hispanic race were positively associated with initiating HIV primary care. Crack cocaine use in the past 30 days and male gender were negatively associated with initiating care. Injection drug use was not associated with initiation of care. Targeted interventions for crack cocaine users, including drug treatment, may be required to provide optimal HIV primary care use in this population.

Keywords

HIV primary careCrack cocaine useAccess to careMinorities

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toye H. Brewer
    • 1
  • Wei Zhao
    • 2
  • Margaret Pereyra
    • 2
  • Carlos del Rio
    • 3
  • Anita Loughlin
    • 4
    • 7
  • Pamela Anderson-Mahoney
    • 5
  • Lytt Gardner
    • 6
  • Lisa R. Metsch
    • 2
  • for the ARTAS Study Group
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineEmory School of MedicineAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Department of EpidemiologyJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  5. 5.Health Research AssociationLos AngelesUSA
  6. 6.Division of HIV/AIDSCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  7. 7.Center for Pediatric and Vaccine ResearchBoston UniversityBostonUSA