AIDS and Behavior

, 11:409

Knowledge of Maternal HIV/AIDS and Child Adjustment: The Moderating Role of Children’s Relationships with their Mothers

  • Deborah J. Jones
  • Sarah E. Foster
  • Alecia A. Zalot
  • Charlene Chester
  • Antonette King
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-006-9188-1

Cite this article as:
Jones, D.J., Foster, S.E., Zalot, A.A. et al. AIDS Behav (2007) 11: 409. doi:10.1007/s10461-006-9188-1

Abstract

The current study examined whether child-reported maternal warmth and support moderated the association between knowledge of maternal illness and child psychosocial adjustment among 86 low-income, African American mothers with HIV/AIDS and their non-infected children. Mother–child relationship quality moderated the association between children’s knowledge of maternal HIV/AIDS and children’s externalizing, but not internalizing, difficulties. Consistent with the stress-buffering hypothesis, a warm and supportive mother–child relationship afforded a more robust buffer against externalizing difficulties for children who knew of their mother’s illness than for children who did not. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed.

Keywords

African AmericanHIV/AIDSMother–child relationship qualityChild adjustment

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah J. Jones
    • 1
  • Sarah E. Foster
    • 1
  • Alecia A. Zalot
    • 1
  • Charlene Chester
    • 1
  • Antonette King
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologySan Francisco State UniversitySan FranciscoUSA