AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 11, Issue 5, pp 753–758

Acceptance of Routine Testing for HIV among Adult Patients at the Medical Emergency Unit at a National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda

  • Damalie Nakanjako
  • Moses Kamya
  • Kyabayinze Daniel
  • Harriet Mayanja-Kizza
  • Jurgen Freers
  • Christopher Whalen
  • Elly Katabira
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-006-9180-9

Cite this article as:
Nakanjako, D., Kamya, M., Daniel, K. et al. AIDS Behav (2007) 11: 753. doi:10.1007/s10461-006-9180-9

Abstract

HIV testing is an entry point to comprehensive HIV/AIDS prevention and care. In Uganda, Routine Testing and Counseling for HIV (RTC) is not widely offered as part of standard medical care in acute care settings. This study determined the acceptance of RTC in a medical emergency setting at Mulago national referral hospital. We interviewed 233 adult patients who were offered HIV testing. Overall, 83% were unaware of their HIV serostatus and 88% of these had been to a health unit in the previous six months. Of the 208 eligible for HIV testing, 95% accepted to test. Half the patients were HIV infected and 77% of these were diagnosed during the study. HIV testing was highly acceptable and detected a significant number of undiagnosed HIV infections. We recommend adoption of RTC as standard of care in the medical emergency unit in order to scale HIV diagnosis and linkage to HIV/AIDS care.

Keywords

AcceptanceRoutine HIV-testingHospitalAfrica

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Damalie Nakanjako
    • 1
  • Moses Kamya
    • 1
  • Kyabayinze Daniel
    • 2
  • Harriet Mayanja-Kizza
    • 1
  • Jurgen Freers
    • 1
  • Christopher Whalen
    • 3
  • Elly Katabira
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineMakerere University KampalaKampalaUganda
  2. 2.Clinical Epidemiology UnitMakerere University KampalaKampalaUganda
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA