AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 10, Issue 5, pp 473–482

Impact of HIV-Related Stigma on Health Behaviors and Psychological Adjustment Among HIV-Positive Men and Women

  • Peter A. Vanable
  • Michael P. Carey
  • Donald C. Blair
  • Rae A. Littlewood
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-006-9099-1

Cite this article as:
Vanable, P.A., Carey, M.P., Blair, D.C. et al. AIDS Behav (2006) 10: 473. doi:10.1007/s10461-006-9099-1

HIV-related stigmatization remains a potent stressor for HIV-positive people. This study examined the relationships among stigma-related experiences and depression, medication adherence, serostatus disclosure, and sexual risk among 221 HIV-positive men and women. In bivariate analyses that controlled for background characteristics, stigma was associated with depressive symptoms, receiving recent psychiatric care, and greater HIV-related symptoms. Stigma was also associated with poorer adherence and more frequent serostatus disclosure to people other than sexual partners, but showed no association to sexual risk behavior. In a multivariate analysis that controlled for all correlates, depression, poor adherence, and serostatus disclosure remained as independent correlates of stigma-related experiences. Findings confirm that stigma is associated with psychological adjustment and adherence difficulties and is experienced more commonly among people who disclose their HIV status to a broad range of social contacts. Stigma should be addressed in stress management, health promotion, and medication adherence interventions for HIV-positive people.

KEY WORDS:

StigmaHIVsexual behavioradherencedepressiondisclosure

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter A. Vanable
    • 1
    • 3
  • Michael P. Carey
    • 1
  • Donald C. Blair
    • 2
  • Rae A. Littlewood
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Center for Health and BehaviorSyracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineSUNY Upstate Medical UniversitySyracuseUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychology and Center for Health and Behavior, 430 Huntington HallSyracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA