AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 10, Issue 6, pp 699–705

Providers’ HIV Prevention Discussions with HIV-Seropositive Injection Drug Users

  • James D. Wilkinson
  • Wei Zhao
  • Scott Santibanez
  • Julia Arnsten
  • Amy Knowlton
  • Cynthia A. Gómez
  • Lisa R. Metsch
  • INSPIRE Study Group
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-006-9088-4

Cite this article as:
Wilkinson, J.D., Zhao, W., Santibanez, S. et al. AIDS Behav (2006) 10: 699. doi:10.1007/s10461-006-9088-4

Abstract

Public health agencies have recommended incorporating HIV prevention counseling into the medical care of persons living with HIV/AIDS. Injection drug users (IDUs) especially need HIV risk-reduction counseling because of their high risk for HIV transmission through both sexual and injection behaviors. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of, and patient factors associated with, the delivery of HIV prevention messages to HIV-seropositive IDUs in primary care settings. A majority of participants reported having an HIV prevention discussion with their provider during their most recent primary care visit. Factors significantly associated with report of such discussion were being Hispanic or non-Hispanic Black; high school education or less; and better perception of engagement with provider. Medical providers should provide prevention messages to all HIV-seropositive IDUs, regardless of demographic factors. Effective HIV prevention interventions in primary care settings, including interventions to improve patient-provider communication, are needed for HIV-seropositive IDUs.

Key Words

Human immunodeficiency virusAcquired immunodeficiency syndromeSubstance abuse, intravenousPrimary health carePrevention and control

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • James D. Wilkinson
    • 1
  • Wei Zhao
    • 1
  • Scott Santibanez
    • 2
  • Julia Arnsten
    • 3
  • Amy Knowlton
    • 4
  • Cynthia A. Gómez
    • 5
  • Lisa R. Metsch
    • 1
  • INSPIRE Study Group
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Miller School of MedicineUniversity of MiamiMiamiUSA
  2. 2.National Center for HIV, STD, & TB PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineMontefiore Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Department of Behavior and HealthJohn Hopkins School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  5. 5.Center for AIDS Prevention StudiesUniversity of California at San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA