AIDS and Behavior

, 10:149

Sex Trade, Sexual Risk, and Nondisclosure of HIV Serostatus: Findings from HIV-Infected Persons with a History of Alcohol Problems

  • Anita Raj
  • Debbie M. Cheng
  • Rachel Levison
  • Seville Meli
  • Jeffrey H. Samet
Commercial Sex Workers

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-005-9050-x

Cite this article as:
Raj, A., Cheng, D.M., Levison, R. et al. AIDS Behav (2006) 10: 149. doi:10.1007/s10461-005-9050-x

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between disclosure of HIV serostatus to sex partners and recent sexual risk behavior, substance abuse, and violence among sexually active HIV-infected patients with a history of alcohol problems. Participants (n = 124) were 79% males; age 25–61 years; 49% Black; and 35% with less than a high school education. Separate logistic regression models were used to assess relationships between each independent variable of interest and nondisclosure. Results demonstrate that buying sex and having more than one sex partner in the past 6 months were significantly associated with nondisclosure of HIV serostatus to a sex partner. Findings from this study underscore the ongoing need for behavioral interventions with HIV-infected individuals concerning disclosure. Programs that emphasize serostatus disclosure and/or consistent condom use in the context of sex trade and with multiple sexual partners will be particularly important.

KEY WORDS:

HIVserostatus disclosuresex risksex tradedrug risk behaviorsviolence

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anita Raj
    • 1
    • 4
  • Debbie M. Cheng
    • 2
  • Rachel Levison
    • 3
  • Seville Meli
    • 3
  • Jeffrey H. Samet
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Social Behavioral SciencesBoston University School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiostatisticsBoston University School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  3. 3.Clinical Addiction Research and Education (CARE) UnitSection of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical CenterBostonUSA
  4. 4.Boston University School of Public HealthBostonUSA