AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 179–184

Predictors of Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing Among Sexually Active Homeless Youth

  • M. Rosa Solorio
  • Norweeta G. Milburn
  • Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus
  • Chandra Higgins
  • Lillian Gelberg
Other Research Articles

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-005-9044-8

Cite this article as:
Rosa Solorio, M., Milburn, N.G., Rotheram-Borus, M.J. et al. AIDS Behav (2006) 10: 179. doi:10.1007/s10461-005-9044-8

We examined the association between sexual risk behaviors and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing in a sample of homeless youth. Of 261 youth interviewed, 50% had been sexually active in the past 3 months. Gender variation in sexual behaviors and risk were found. Boys were more likely than girls to engage in anal sex (46% vs. 15%), to have 3 or more sexual partners (46% vs. 17%) and to engage in anonymous sex (38% vs. 21%). Girls were less likely to use condoms consistently and more likely to engage in sex with a partner suspected of having an STI (20% vs. 4%). In the past 3 months, the STI testing rates were similar for boys and girls (46%). However, girls were more likely to have positive STI results (46% vs. 9%). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, the only variable that was an independent predictor of STI testing was having either gotten someone or having become pregnant in the past 3 months. High-risk sexual behaviors did not predict STI testing in our sample. Outreach programs are needed that target sexually active homeless youth for early STI testing and treatment.

KEY WORDS:

homeless youthsexual behaviorsSTI testing.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Rosa Solorio
    • 1
    • 3
  • Norweeta G. Milburn
    • 2
  • Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus
    • 2
  • Chandra Higgins
    • 1
  • Lillian Gelberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Family MedicineDavid Geffen School of Medicine at University of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Neuropsychiatric InstituteCenter for Community Health, University of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Family Medicine10880 Wilshire BoulevardLos AngelesUSA