AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 179–184

Predictors of Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing Among Sexually Active Homeless Youth

Authors

    • Department of Family MedicineDavid Geffen School of Medicine at University of California
    • David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Family Medicine10880 Wilshire Boulevard
  • Norweeta G. Milburn
    • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Neuropsychiatric InstituteCenter for Community Health, University of California
  • Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus
    • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Neuropsychiatric InstituteCenter for Community Health, University of California
  • Chandra Higgins
    • Department of Family MedicineDavid Geffen School of Medicine at University of California
  • Lillian Gelberg
    • Department of Family MedicineDavid Geffen School of Medicine at University of California
Other Research Articles

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-005-9044-8

Cite this article as:
Rosa Solorio, M., Milburn, N.G., Rotheram-Borus, M.J. et al. AIDS Behav (2006) 10: 179. doi:10.1007/s10461-005-9044-8

We examined the association between sexual risk behaviors and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing in a sample of homeless youth. Of 261 youth interviewed, 50% had been sexually active in the past 3 months. Gender variation in sexual behaviors and risk were found. Boys were more likely than girls to engage in anal sex (46% vs. 15%), to have 3 or more sexual partners (46% vs. 17%) and to engage in anonymous sex (38% vs. 21%). Girls were less likely to use condoms consistently and more likely to engage in sex with a partner suspected of having an STI (20% vs. 4%). In the past 3 months, the STI testing rates were similar for boys and girls (46%). However, girls were more likely to have positive STI results (46% vs. 9%). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, the only variable that was an independent predictor of STI testing was having either gotten someone or having become pregnant in the past 3 months. High-risk sexual behaviors did not predict STI testing in our sample. Outreach programs are needed that target sexually active homeless youth for early STI testing and treatment.

KEY WORDS:

homeless youthsexual behaviorsSTI testing.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006