AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 459–464

Psychosocial Impact of Repeat HIV-Negative Testing: A Follow-Up Study

Authors

    • HIV Social, Behavioural and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Toronto
    • Polaris HIV Seroconversion Study, Department of Public Health ScienceUniversity of Toronto
  • Dennis J. Haubrich
    • School of Social Work, Faculty of Community ServicesRyerson University
  • Domenico Callà
    • HIV Social, Behavioural and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Toronto
  • Ted Myers
    • HIV Social, Behavioural and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Toronto
  • Ann N. Burchell
    • HIV Social, Behavioural and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Toronto
  • Liviana Calzavara
    • HIV Social, Behavioural and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Toronto
    • Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Toronto
HIV Testing and Counseling

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-005-9032-z

Cite this article as:
Ryder, K., Haubrich, D.J., Callà, D. et al. AIDS Behav (2005) 9: 459. doi:10.1007/s10461-005-9032-z

Continued sexual risk behavior following repeatedly testing HIV-negative in the Polaris HIV Seroconversion Study (Ontario, Canada) led to this follow-up study which identifies the impact of repeat negative testing among 64 men and women. Repeat HIV-negative testing frequently results in confusion as to what constitutes risk and occasionally to thoughts of HIV immunity. Narrative accounts include beliefs that monogamy constitutes safety from HIV, that psychosocial factors other than repeatedly testing negative leads to risk, and that sexual risk reduction is unsustainable. In conclusion, the repeat negative test experience for some neither clarifies risk behavior nor reinforces sustained risk reduction.

KEY WORDS:

repeat HIV-negative testing psychosocial impact men who have sex with men heterosexuals

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005